Purple Cauliflower Soup

cauliflower

Photo courtesy Newsweek

The cauliflower, like the Brussels sprout, is a much maligned vegetable — the texture is weirdly rigid yet crumbly, the color is boring, the taste is bland and the smell, oh don’t even get me started!

Actually, I’m pro cauliflower, but I can relate to people who aren’t. After all, many of us grew up with steamed or, worse still, boiled cauliflower plopped onto our plates next to mushy peas and carrots at the school cafeteria. It’s hard to shake these early experiences and it’s entirely possible that your distaste for the humble cauliflower is rooted in trauma. Time to let it go. Because…cauliflower is awesome.

Cauliflower may not exude the rustic charm of the heirloom carrot, the accessibility of broccoli or the trendiness of kale, but when it comes to nutritional content, it’s a winner. In fact,Β this vegΒ is a veritable powerhouse of vitamins and minerals and it’s finally starting to see some of the recognition it deserves, with reports of it being the next superfood and of 2014 being “the year of the cauliflower”. It’s also popping up on gourmet restaurant menus across the US.

Consider the cauliflower

What’s so good about it? For starters, it’s part of the cruciferous family of vegetables, which includes broccoli, kale, bok choy, cabbage, kohlrabi, daikon and yes, Brussels sprouts. Cruciferous vegetables contain glucosinolates, which are responsible for their distinct pungent aroma, but also break down to form active compounds like nitriles and indoles, which are purported to have anti-cancer properties.

Like other cruciferous vegetables, cauliflower is also rich in sulforaphane, a sulfur compound that is credited with benefits ranging from improved blood pressure and kidney function, to detoxification and aiding with digestive health. Sulforaphane has also been linked to a reduction in cancer stem cells and tumor growth.

Cauliflower is also loaded with minerals and vitamins — including vitamin C, vitamin K, beta-carotene and other anti-oxidants and anti-inflammatory nutrients, which can help reduce the likelihood of diseases like arthritis and diabetes. Finally, cauliflower is low in calories and packed with fiber, an added benefit if you’re trying to lose weight. If you’re interested in learning more, two great roundups here and here.

Armed with that knowledge, let’s dive into our cauliflower recipe for the day!

Purple Cauliflower Soup

Photo Oct 20, 7 20 28 PM

I love bright colors in food. Eating the rainbow is a great way to guarantee yourself a good dose of nutrients. (I’m not talking about skittles obviously.)

When it comes to veggies, nothing beats the color purple. Typically, the purple hue in fruit and veg is accounted for by anthocyanins which, you guessed it, are loaded with antioxidants and flavonoids like resveratrol. Naturally, when I came across this beautiful purple cauliflower at the Bondi Road Fruitologist last night, I had to have it!

This soup is creamy, vegan and absolutely delicious. You can eat it hot or cold, in summer or winter and it’ll wow your dinner party guests and charm your kids alike. Let’s go!

Ingredients (serves 4-6)

  • 1 medium purple cauliflower
  • 4 small new potatoes (to thicken)
  • 1 white onion
  • 1-2 cloves garlic or 1 tsp minced garlic paste
  • 1-2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3-4 cups water or vegetable stock
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • cayenne to taste

Method

Prep your veggies: peel and chop the onion, wash and quarter the potatoes, rinse and break the cauliflower down into smaller florets.

Heat some olive oil in a pot and sweat the onions and garlic until they’re translucent. Don’t let them brown. Once they’re ready, add the cauliflower florets and diced potato. Cook down for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. (My cauliflower florets turned a cool neon blue at this point!) Now add the water or veggie stockΒ until the cauliflower is 2/3 of the way submerged. I like to use regular water and throw in half a bouillon cube. Bring the broth to a boil and then reduce heat, cover partially and simmer for 20 minutes.

Photo Oct 20, 7 57 05 PM

Check on the soup at 20 minutes and add salt, pepper and cayenne to taste. Cook another 10 minutes as needed with the cover removed. Let your soup cool before getting your immersion blender out and working through it. If you don’t have an immersion blender you can use a regular mixer or magic bullet and handle the soup in batches. Transfer to a large bowl and garnish with with whatever you like.

Serve….and enjoy!

Photo Oct 20, 8 46 14 PM

2 responses

    • If you like crunchy florets you should try roasting some cauliflower with olive oil and cumin or curry powder, delicious! For this soup, by the time you’ve cooked it, the florets will be broken down and mushy, with the water separated out. Not sure the texture will be to your liking unless you blend it, but you can always give it a go πŸ™‚

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